Spotlight on Graduate Research

Communications technology helps immigrants adapt to Canada, recent grad finds

There’s often an expectation that when people move here from another nation they should immerse themselves in Canadian culture, but maintaining a close connection to their home country makes them better immigrants, according to a recent PhD graduate.

And modern communications technology is enabling that connection, says Frances Cachon who recently defended her thesis in Sociology, Anthropology, & Criminology and is working as a sessional instructor there.

PhD student hopes to make life easier for young Arab immigrants

Nesreen Elkord wants to make life a little simpler for young Arabs who are new to Canada.

“It’s really my passion to try to make the experiences of these kids easier than it was for me,” says Elkord, a PhD student in the Faculty of Education who studies under the tutelage of professor Shi Jing Xu. “I know I can’t do that all by myself, but I do feel that I have a duty to do this work.”

HK student tried out for Toronto Triumph for research purposes

Katrina Krawec knows what it means to go the extra yard for the sake of her research.

A graduate student in the university’s kinesiology department, she’s studying the differences between two Canadian women’s tackle football leagues – one which requires its players to wear full uniforms, the other in which they play in bikinis.

Last year, she actually tried out for the Toronto Triumph, one of four Canadian teams in what until recently was known as the Lingerie Football League.

Communications grad student balances research with First Nations advocacy work

Andrea Landry’s tiny, remote aboriginal community in Northern Ontario isn’t immune to the challenges that plague so many similar places, but regardless of the problems and the external perceptions of her people, she’s still filled with a great sense of optimism for their future.

“When people come to our communities, they see high levels of poverty, substance abuse and suicide, but they don’t see how connected we are to our culture,” says the graduate student from Pays-Plat Ontario, a First Nations community of about 60 people located three hours east of Thunder Bay.

Vanier scholarship a recognition for grad student's work

Meet Mehrdad Shademan for the first time and it’s easy to get the impression he’s a fairly quiet, low-key type of guy. He wasn’t so mild-mannered, however, the day he found out he was the recipient of a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship.

“I was screaming and yelling,” he says in the graduate student office he shares with colleagues in the Ed Lumley Centre for Engineering Innovation. “Everybody was pretty shocked.”