Spotlight on Graduate Research

University of Windsor women's basketball head coach Chantelle Vallée works with players during a practice on Jan. 31, 2018.University of Windsor women's basketball head coach Chantelle Vallée works with players during a practice on Jan. 31, 2018.

Value of same-sex coaches extends beyond the court, says UWin student

Taylor Imeson wants to see more women in head coaching positions.

Not only would it provide female athletes with same-sex mentors, but she says it would inspire future generations of female coaches to pursue the career.

"I had always noticed that women's sports were growing, but there were barely any female coaches," says Imeson.

"Participants felt they had the necessary skills and self-efficacy to coach, however, due to various reasons, a majority did not identify coaching as a career aspiration."

Julia Borsatto, UWindsor clinical neuropsychology graduate student, and Laura Pineault (B.Sc. 2016) are associate directors of Aphasia Friendly Canada.Julia Borsatto, UWindsor clinical neuropsychology graduate student, and Laura Pineault (B.Sc. 2016) are associate directors of Aphasia Friendly Canada.

Researchers work with businesses, community to support people with aphasia

There are few things more dispiriting than losing the ability to communicate. And yet, every year, thousands of people across Canada awake to a new reality filled with elusive words and illegible text.

It’s this growing population that a team from the University of Windsor has set out to provide with a new voice and a new lease on life.

Robert Wilson performs a leg extension at the St. Denis Centre as part of the Adapted Physical Exercise (APEX) program coordinated by PhD student Kelly Carr in partnership with Community Living Essex County.Robert Wilson performs a leg extension at the St. Denis Centre as part of the Adapted Physical Exercise (APEX) program coordinated by PhD student Kelly Carr in partnership with Community Living Essex County.

HK grad student combats stigma of disability

Kelly Carr wants to destroy barriers.

That’s why her research as a PhD student at the University of Windsor has worked to showcase the strengths of people with disabilities to combat the negative stigma that often follows them throughout their lives.

Carr’s research is broken into three phases and examines how people with an intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) participating in a physical exercise program, meaningful employment and elite sports can influence opinion.