Miah-Marie Langlois

UWindsor student skips past provincial competition

Jumping rope should be an Olympic sport, says Shelby Toews.

“Until it is, the talent jumpers have will always be overlooked, and it’s unfortunate,” says the third-year environmental sciences student. “Since it isn’t in the Olympics, people don’t realize the dedication and hard work it takes.”

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Campus poet to conduct public reading

Susan Holbrook, associate professor in the Department of English Language, Literature and Creative Writing and a 2011/12 fellow of the Humanities Research Group, will read from her own poetry on Wednesday, March 28.

“Gest: a poetry reading” is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. in Assumption University’s Freed Orman Centre. Sponsored by the Humanities Research Group, it is free and open to the public; a reception will follow.

Organization of Part-time University Students honours founder

Josie Iannetta was a very kind and caring person whose legacy will live on, says Maryan Amalow, executive director of the Organization of Part-time University Students.

The founding president of OPUS, Iannetta died February 14. The organization paid tribute to her at its annual awards banquet March 15.

“We all know how much of an impact she has had on OPUS and how compassionate and caring she was,” Amalow said. “Her legacy and the advocacy she did during those times for OPUS impressed us. We will always remember and appreciate her efforts and support.”

Spring is busting out all over

Spring 2012 may be just a few days old, but don’t tell Mother Nature that – she has the season well underway in Windsor. More than a week of record warm temperatures has campus flowers blooming much earlier than normal.

A DailyNews photographer captured a few blossoms to share.

Violets

Violets are edible, though pretty bland unless candied.

Single magnolia blossom

Women’s basketball gold medal game wins local broadcast

Cogeco cable 11 will air the Canadian Interuniversity Sport women’s basketball gold medal game between the Windsor Lancers and UBC Thunderbirds at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 22, and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 24.

The CIS named Lancer guard Miah-Marie Langlois its female athlete of the week after she led her team to the national championship.

Medical historian to explore relationship of plague to poverty

Notions of class have been rooted at least in part in physiology, says Kevin Siena.

An associate professor of history at Trent University, he will explore the contributions of medical literature to that process in his free public lecture, “Rotten Bodies: Plague, Fever, and the Plebeian Body in Early Modern England,” Friday, March 23, at 5 p.m. in the Oak Room, Vanier Hall.

Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century plague and fever tracts commonly connected epidemics with poverty, Dr. Siena says.

Lecture to consider role of schools in promoting healthier diets for children

Canada’s young people are overweight, and poor eating habits are a major reason why, says Rhona Hanning.

An associate professor in the  School of Public Health and Health Systems at the University of Waterloo , she will deliver a free public lecture entitled “Promoting Healthier Diets for Kids: Can Schools Make a Difference,” at noon on Friday, March 23, in room 145, Human Kinetics Building.