Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research

UWindsor's Dr. Aaron Fisk will be interviewed on the Cats Roundtable radio show on Sunday, April 1.UWindsor's Dr. Aaron Fisk will be interviewed on the Cats Roundtable radio show on Sunday, April 1.

Professor to be featured on east coast radio show

UWindsor’s resident Greenland shark expert will be making waves on the east coast this weekend.

Aaron Fisk, professor at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, will be a guest on the CatsRoundtable radio program airing this Sunday between 8:30 and 10 a.m.

Hosted by American businessman John Catsimatidis, the show is broadcasted weekly in New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Buffalo.

UWindsor's Dr. Aaron Fisk, Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Changing Great Lakes Ecosystems, officially launches the Real-Time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network on Friday, March 16, 2017.UWindsor's Dr. Aaron Fisk, Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Changing Great Lakes Ecosystems, officially launches the Real-Time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network on Friday, March 16, 2017.

Research community celebrates launch of Real-time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network

Researchers will monitor the Great Lakes with a network of real-time sensors, autonomous sub-surface vehicles, and independent instruments.

UWindsor professor Dr. Aaron Fisk received $15.9 million in funding for the Real-time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network.UWindsor professor Dr. Aaron Fisk received $15.9 million in funding for the Real-time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network.

UWindsor researcher champions collaborative freshwater research project

The Great Lakes will have a network of well-equipped guardians thanks to a plan hatched by a UWindsor researcher with funding from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and Ontario’s Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science and Ministry of Economic Development and Growth.

Aaron Fisk and his nine collaborators will receive $15.9 million for the Real-time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network (RAEON), a collaborative research project which will provide infrastructure and data management for Canadian scientists to carry-out cutting-edge research on freshwater ecosystems.

Nigel HusseyUWindsor researcher Nigel Hussey spoke to The Society for Marine Mammalogy about advancing an ecosystem field approach to understand and manage aquatic predators during its 22nd Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals in Halifax on Thursday, October 26.

Researcher makes waves at marine mammal conference

UWindsor researcher Nigel Hussey gave an address at the biennial conference of the Society for Marine Mammalogy.

Researchers from around the world will converge on Windsor this week for the 2017 Canada-China Water Science Workshop hosted by UWindsor's Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research.Researchers from around the world will converge on Windsor this week for the 2017 Canada-China Water Science Workshop hosted by UWindsor's Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research.

Researchers converge on Windsor for 2017 Canada-China Water Science Workshop

Buried beneath the surface of China’s plateau lakes could lie the solutions to some of the challenges currently facing the Great Lakes.

It’s one of the topics that will be discussed in Windsor this week at the 2017 Canada-China Water Science Workshop hosted by the University of Windsor’s Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research.

York University's Sarah Laframboise prepares glass vials to be used in the sampling of water across Essex County on Aug. 19, 2017. The biomedical science student and Windsor native is assisting in the sample collection.York University's Sarah Laframboise prepares glass vials to be used in the sampling of water across Essex County on Aug. 19, 2017. The biomedical science student and Windsor native is assisting in the sample collection.

Citizen scientists sought for water sample collection

Researchers from the University of Windsor are seeking citizen scientists to fan out across Essex County and collect water samples for use in measuring harmful E. coli bacteria.

“Right now, it’s commonplace to think that if the E. coli levels are high at area beaches, then the pathogens will be high as well,” explained Subba Rao Chaganti, an adjunct professor at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research. “Very few E. coli strains are harmful, so this project is going to develop tools to detect the actual pathogens that are harmful to humans in a much faster way.”