Garry Moore

Mike Havey, Garry Moore, Moussa Hamadani, Amin Safaei, Eric Vandenbroucke, Sandra OndrackaAthletic director Mike Havey, grounds supervisor Garry Moore, UWSA president Moussa Hamadani, GSS president Amin Safaei, associate athletic director Eric Vandenbroucke, and Campus Recreation coordinator Sandra Ondracka celebrate the installation of a temporary cricket pitch on the Lancers upper field.

Athletics makes pitch for cricketers

The Department of Athletics and Recreation Services is pleased with the installation of a temporary cricket pitch on the south campus.

Audit turns up additional opportunities for recycling

Sorting through the University’s garbage can be a little disheartening, says Taylor Purdy.

A master’s student of environmental engineering, she combed through a pile of trash Friday outside the maintenance compound on Union Avenue, conducting an audit of the waste produced on campus.

“At least half of this could have been recycled,” Purdy said. “It’s especially sad because this pile comes from the Centre for Engineering Innovation, a LEED-certified building where we are not recycling like we could be.”

Awards recognize heart-warming contributions of University employees

It was cold in Windsor on Wednesday, but hearing testimonies to the winners of Employee Recognition Awards was enough to warm anyone’s heart, chief human resources officer Rita LaCivita told a reception gathered in Vanier Hall to honour the inaugural group of award recipients.

Reception to recognize and celebrate outstanding employee contributions

The Department of Human Resources invites the campus community to the first annual Employee Recognition Awards reception, Wednesday, January 23, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Vanier Hall’s Winclare A.

This event has been designed to celebrate the outstanding contributions of all employees to the achievement of the University’s mission and vision, says chief human resources officer Rita LaCivita.

At this event, the Employee Recognition Program Awards will be presented to the following individuals/teams:

Campus planting sparks sharing of tree stories

The Kentucky coffee tree (Gymnocladus dioica) derives its common name from reports that early European settlers used its seedpods as a coffee substitute. The species survives in Canada only in southwestern Ontario, where it is considered threatened.

That population grew by one Wednesday, as the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and the Jull EES Club helped to plant a specimen in front of Memorial Hall in celebration of National Tree Day.