Staff

Lancer Engineering campers put the finishing touches on their apparatus that will carry their egg from the third floor of the Ed Lumley Centre for Engineering Innovation to the ground.Lancer Engineering campers put the finishing touches on their apparatus that will carry their egg from the third floor of the Ed Lumley Centre for Engineering Innovation to the ground.

Campers hatch a plan in engineering egg drop

Sydney Ryan may have had a slight advantage over her fellow campers.

The 12-year-old has a knack for engineering and builds race car tracks for her brothers and boats at home using found materials.

So, it’s no surprise that when tasked with the challenge to bring an egg safely to the ground from three storeys up, Ryan had a plan.

“We are trying to make a bird’s nest and have a base with a spongey-kind of foam material, a layer of paper and then a web of tight string that goes on either side of the egg,” Ryan said, who will be going into Grade 8 in the fall.

Talbot Trail Public School Principal Chris Mills and University of Windsor's Shijing Xu participate in a Skype call with Ren He Jei Primary School in Chongqing, China.Talbot Trail Public School Principal Chris Mills and University of Windsor's Shijing Xu participate in a Skype call with Ren He Jei Primary School in Chongqing, China.

UWindsor sister-school program 'life-changing' for local principal

On a rainy Tuesday evening, educators at Talbot Trail Public School sat in a semi-circle and fixed their gaze on a screen in the library.

Seven geometric shapes of various colours lay scattered in front of each person while on the other side of the world, educators in Chongqing, China began a lesson on Grade 2 arithmetic.

“This has been a life-changing experience for us,” said Talbot Trail principal Chris Mills.

“We are able to learn what works over there and they are learning what works over here.”

An African rhinoceros is pictured in this handout photo.An African rhinoceros is pictured in this handout photo.

UWindsor students confront illegal trade in rhino horn

It is so coveted that it’s worth more than its weight in gold.

Its intended use has long been proven ineffectual, and yet the demand is contributing to the obliteration of a species.

The illegal trade of rhinoceros horn in Africa is fraught with controversy and two University of Windsor business students have become engrossed in the issue.

“It’s just not fair to these animals,” said master of business administration student Fred Wilkins.