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Graduate Students

UWindsor writer-in-residence Donato Mancini will be reciting poems he has written during his time on campus at a year-end reading and celebration on Monday, Dec. 4 at 4 p.m.UWindsor writer-in-residence Donato Mancini will be reciting poems he has written during his time on campus at a year-end reading and celebration on Monday, Dec. 4 at 4 p.m.

Writer-in-residence reflects on time at UWindsor

Donato Mancini’s time at the University of Windsor provided him with something many writers yearn for — the opportunity to focus exclusively on his craft.

“That’s what everybody craves and wishes for,” the writer-in-residence said. “It’s why people take themselves off the grid and unplug for weeks at a time.

“The amount of progress you can make in a few really focused weeks is so much more than a whole year of working in fits and starts and in time off.”

M. Eng student Neel Nitinkumar Shah describes his co-op experience at Windsor Mold Group during a poster presentation on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017M. Eng student Neel Nitinkumar Shah describes his co-op experience at Windsor Mold Group during a poster presentation on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017

M.Eng students share co-op experience

A co-op placement provided more than practical work experience for Bhavesh Lakhankiya.

Not only did the master of engineering student gain invaluable experience working at Diageo Canada Inc. in Amherstburg, Ont., but Lakhankiya also said he learned something that can’t be taught in the classroom.

“As an international student, this was my first opportunity to work within the Canadian work culture,” Lakhankiya said, who grew up in India.

Julia Borsatto, UWindsor clinical neuropsychology graduate student, and Laura Pineault (B.Sc. 2016) are associate directors of Aphasia Friendly Canada.Julia Borsatto, UWindsor clinical neuropsychology graduate student, and Laura Pineault (B.Sc. 2016) are associate directors of Aphasia Friendly Canada.

Researchers work with businesses, community to support people with aphasia

There are few things more dispiriting than losing the ability to communicate. And yet, every year, thousands of people across Canada awake to a new reality filled with elusive words and illegible text.

It’s this growing population that a team from the University of Windsor has set out to provide with a new voice and a new lease on life.

tweed jacket and bowtieIt’s not all tweed anymore: come hear a panel discussing careers in academe November 17 in the Welcome Centre.

Panel to discuss careers in academe

A panel of successful academics will discuss careers in higher education November 17 in the Welcome Centre.

professional holding clipboardA workshop November 16 will give grad students resources to help them with their academic and professional communication skills.

Session to offer graduate students communication skills

A workshop November 16 will give grad students resources to help them with their academic and professional communication skills.

Nigel HusseyUWindsor researcher Nigel Hussey spoke to The Society for Marine Mammalogy about advancing an ecosystem field approach to understand and manage aquatic predators during its 22nd Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals in Halifax on Thursday, October 26.

Researcher makes waves at marine mammal conference

UWindsor researcher Nigel Hussey gave an address at the biennial conference of the Society for Marine Mammalogy.

UWindsor history professor Max Nelson holds a reproduction of a Philistine beer jug from around 1200 BC in his office on Sept. 22. Dr. Nelson will participate in a symposium discussing the ancient beverage on Sept. 30.UWindsor history professor Max Nelson holds a reproduction of a Philistine beer jug from around 1200 BC in his office on Sept. 22. Dr. Nelson will participate in a symposium discussing the ancient beverage on Sept. 30.

Cheers to the barbarians: UWindsor to host symposium on ancient brews

The next time you’re sipping on a pint of your favourite peanut butter porter, take a moment to pour one out for the barbarians.

If it weren’t for those Germanic tribes in northern Europe, says University of Windsor professor Max Nelson, the popular alcoholic beverage may still be considered the “effeminate drink of foreigners.”

“The Greeks held pseudo-scientific beliefs about alcohol, including that wine is hot and manly while beer is cold and effeminate,” Dr. Nelson said.

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